Slings, hoists and money pits

Standard

Another disability money making scheme?

Recently I had the annual inspection of my ceiling hoist. My hoist covers the area from my bed to my toilet and wheelchair. The inspection includes a visual check that my sling is safe to use. In fact, the law requires a sling inspection twice each year. It costs around £100 for a hoist and sling safety assessment.

My sling is as rugged as hell – in fact I can’t imagine how it would get torn or ripped without slashing it with a knife several times!! Basically it would probably last me 20 years.

However … and here is the rip-off, the sling can fail and be declared instantly unusable if the serial number can not be read.

Now, slings are made to be washed – and just like clothes, the little cloth tag can begin to show faded writing. So my £500-600 sling could be assigned to the bin after a years worth of washes! A perfectly maintained and safe sling, thrown away because of a faded number.

Will companies make a serial number that is permanent that can withstand several washes? Apparently, the word on the street is that key companies were asked to do just that but refused because it brings them greater profits by forcing everyone to repurchase new ones. Imagine schools and hospitals having to pay out thousands each year to get new slings that are otherwise safe to use.

Equally, a company can say they no longer ‘support’ a particular hoist model and the user also has to throw that out within six months as they are automatically deemed unsafe.

The overall result is that individuals, schools and hospitals, public swimming pools, social services and companies who have Changing Places hoist equipment are throwing away large amounts of equipment that may still be usable for a number of years.

Products that are purchased are now being chosen because they are cheap to replace and not because they are safe, dignified, comfy and the ‘right one’ for the user.

Calling all manufacturers…

I invite manufacturers of patient slings and hoists to comment on their policies and manufacturing processes where efforts are being made to ensure serial / product numbers can last the lifetime of any sling and that ‘discontinued’ products can still be supported for the life of existing equipment . These would also come under the companies policy to cut down on environmental waste.