All about support / grab rails

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Taken from our guide (see links page) we look at the importance of support rails in accessible toilets. AD M is approved document M of the U.K. Building Regulations.

It is possible to have many layouts to allow for the provided dimensions and fixture configurations in AD M.
 

The general layout of a unisex accessible toilet is to have horizontal grab rails to both the left and right side of the toilet [AD M: S 5.8].

Heights, lengths and distance from the toilet / sink / mirror etc must be precise as described in AD M.
Vertical rails must also be provided in specific places.

How many rails do people need?

74% of disabled/older people use handrails. They can be used to pull/push up with or simply to lean on for stability.

41% of powered wheelchair users prefer the right side, 30% the left and the rest had no preference in a 2005 study.

Some people need a rail both sides and on the back wall.  The rails needs to be the right height, length, distance from the toilet/sink, thickness and colour.

An accessible toilet must  have at least 5 support rails with additional ones if the toilet is located some distance from the wall. 


Barriers introduced

As can be seen above, support rails can infringe on the transfer space and cause problems for some wheelchair users.

Solutions

  1. Assess your toilet – do they have the full complement of support rails and are they in the right place and the right length / height? 
  2. Mix it up – the standard suggests that if you provide more than one unisex toilet, a choice of layouts for left and right hand transfer should be provided. 
  3. The smaller the space, the more grab rails will get in the way for powered wheelchair users and carers – re-consider your design space. 
  4. Provide Changing Places toilets in addition to existing accessible toilets. The larger spaces to the left and right of a central toilet offer more transfer option angles for people who use powered wheelchairs, large walkers/ frames, or need carers to assist them.

Time for a Change?

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The campaign for toilets with an adult bench, hoist and space for 2 carers resulted in the Changing Places Consortium being formed 10 years ago.

Whilst significant campaigning (largely by individuals with varying styles and mostly by parents) has resulted in the provision of over 850 of these toilets, we wondered whether it’s time for a change? 

Campaign success?

There is no single campaign or campaign  strategy for changing places – individuals can do whatever they want. This makes the campaigns disjointed and dilutes or replicates efforts. You see this regularly across the multitude of social media accounts/Facebook Pages and private blogs identifying themselves as campaigners using the CP symbol. Whilst Aveso and the Consortium generate information sheets and ‘Selfie Kits’ etc … there is a blurring of who or what is the ‘official’ approach. 

Protecting young people

Take the recent episode of parents who collected and posted pictures on the Internet of children (and other people’s children and young adults) on the toilet floor, face showing and wearing incontinence pads. Young people unable to consent to this undignified use of their image. If a school or care business did this it would be a serious child protection and human rights issue. However, when I raised this as a concern the Consortium said parent campaigners are not affiliated with them and can do as they wish. This didn’t stop their official social media accounts from sharing the images.  Mixed messages ensued across multiple Internet forums. The rights of the child were lost amidst the the cause, angering many disabled people.

Would not the responsible approach be to support campaigners with training in methods and ideas which protect the privacy and dignity of children? Just because dignity was lost in being on the floor doesn’t mean the indignity should be extended by their image being shared.  Is this the sort of campaign that can only achieve success by using increasingly shocking images? Thankfully many people did indeed use their creativity and there has been a reduction in the use of children as dignity martyrs – and so individual efforts continue and the campaign actively promotes them. 

Pen v. sword?

Individuals can approach companies in any way they want ranging from polite letters and personal conversations to social media harassment. 

It is likely that as much harm as good has been done with these tactics which has divided campaigners for toilet equality.  How can you have a meaningful, positive conversation when the previous contact they had with a campaigner was focusesd on personal anger, emotion and frustration. 

It’s easy to get angry when you have struggled that day in a cramped toilet and are gathering up your evidence to make a complaint or have ‘that’ conversation. You want to throw the book at them, yell at them. You want to drag them into the toilet and make them see what you have to go through. You want them to empathise and make things right – but all you get is a ‘sorry you were unconvenienced’ letter to fuel the next stage of complaint. 

It’s hard not to let personal emotions damage your chances of negotiating an agreement to provide a toilet you and thousands of others can use. However, we have to remain polite, persistent, factual and professional. Unfortunately not all campaigners do – and that’s a big problem.

Time to rename and rebrand?

Many have kept their distance or tried to move things on locally. There have been issues with Changing Places being built that fall short of the recommended guidelines of 12 sq metres. That said it is a guideline. Some felt a smaller room was acceptable and out sprang the Space to Change campaign with its own logo. Then things became problematic with determining which ones were listed on the CP toilet map.

Recently a local campaign for a new branding of ‘Hoist Assisted Toilets’ has gathered momentum. In fact, one of the problems with the CP toilet was that they were very focused on the needs of people who used incontinence pads. This alienated (in name and focus) people who were continent but needed a hoist or those who needed a bit more space or other equipment. People didn’t like asking for a Changing Place due to the remaining stigma of incontinence. 


This has led to CP toilets being called other names including ‘high dependency unit’, ‘Space to Change’, ‘Adult Changing Room’ etc. It’s confusing and has resulted in staff and visitors talking cross purposes and toilets not being found.  If there was a single campaign with good leadership, one name, one symbol and one strategy then we might have more of these toilets.

The future of toilets 

The result of the above could indicate that change is needed in many areas if we are to benefit from more Changing Places toilets in the UK.

Archived: 2010 journey to Holland

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Archived from 2010.

Journey: Harwich to Hook of Holland + Overnight stay at Premier Inn

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Premier Inn is situated at the port next to Lidle and adjoining a Brewers Fayre. One night cost £61 at the time we booked in January. We had to stay overnight because it meant getting to the ferry 45 mins before we sailed at about 9 am. Much less than 8 hours sleep and my body falls apart. We had a roll in shower, plenty of space and the sink was at a good height to wash my hair in.  Lacking in personality like all of these sorts of rooms – it did the job for the night and we were relatively comfy with little noise outside.

Stena Line – to Hook of Holland on board Britannica (older ferry).

This slightly older ship was refurbished in 2007 and was fantastic.

We selected an accessible cabin for one person as a space to chill out and appeared to be the only wheelchair user on the boat getting a large cabin with tables for 1-2 disabled people.

You can see a 360 photo of  cabins on their web site.

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The only difficulty for me was that the sink is quite high and basin was  inset a way from the edge as opposed to the usual type of sinks in say a Premier Inn.  It was airy, clean and the beds were firm with a soft mattress topper which even I found comfy having scoliosis.

IMG_1002.jpg On board we had free wifi for the duration available on the decks which suited me and my iPhone!

Top Class Service

We were met just outside the lifts by a steward who said they had a reserved area for wheelchair users on board, away from the crowds of people and closely packed tables. So, just to the side of everyone else were 3 tables by a window, with a rope barrier and larger access space clearly signed ‘reserved for our wheelchair accessible guests’ which made me giggle as perhaps the intention got lost in translation now everything was Dutch/English bilingual.  Either way, our steward said just to ask if anyone took our spot and he would ‘hoof them out’.  Sounds good. Not a single person or child tripped over us in our lovely corner and it was away from the hustle and bustle which was lovely. Some people might see it as segregation but there are times and situations you really need your own spot – not just wheelchair users but other people with impairments too. Our steward watched out spot as we went to get some lunch, went to get our cutlery whist my husband carried the tray and basically got us anything we needed.  We felt like royalty,

Our meal was lovely and the journey didn’t last long at all. Right from pulling up in the car, to boarding near the lift through our journey and off the other side it was very good. The ship was clean and tidy and not many people onboard in general. 10/10.

All about the Hollandica Superferry

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This was a trip in 2010 and I have re published for archiving one this project.

Journey: Hook of Holland to Harwich via Stena Lines – Hollandica Superferry

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This ferry was launched this year (April 2010) and will join another Superferry in Autumn.  These cost £375 million pounds.  Shame they didn’t spend much on thinking about the overall experience for disabled people. Granted the ship had some nice touches but compared to our first crossing, the staff support was very poor.

 

 

Cabins.

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Again, we pre booked a cabin with wheelchair access. We had our tickets printed at the car booth which they told us also acts as your room key. This was the same as our first journey.

On locating the cabin (which had us wandering the isles of cabins to work out the number system) we found the door had a small low touch pad with a slot to insert the room key card. It also had a normal handle on the door.  I believe the door was supposed to open automatically.  I say supposed, because it didn’t work.

My husband tried several times and the light flashed but nothing opened. Eventually a member of staff said we had to have a normal key to put in the door.  What use is that!  The automated door was not working and when we got in we could see why – the opening door arm was not fitted but the electronics were there. It was also kind of … orange!

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The bathroom featured a level entry (roll in) shower area with seat and lots of grab rails. The toilet had two grab rails either side and room to side transfer to one side. I’m not that fat but due to scoliosis, lean to the right side. When the grab rails come down they basically wedged me onto the toilet and are closer than what you would find in your average UK accessible toilet. The floor surface is very soft, with good grip but like the previous ferry, the sink is not suitable for hair washing and difficult to reach for me personally.

The bathroom is rather nice but the flat push panel to open the bathroom automatic door is situated above the side unit of the bed on the left of the cabin. So if you have to sleep on the right bed (which I do because of my spine) you can’t press the button from bed.  However, if you are a wheelchair user, how someone could sit on the bed, press the button, transfer into their chair and then get through the door before it closed again in about 10 seconds is beyond me anyway!  The bathroom door swings back and because it is wide, there is only a few set places your wheelchair can go or it hits you and closes again.  If you are standing in the way of the door the force would knock you off your feet – my wheelchair would rock with the force and it’s a weighty machine.  The location of the switch hasn’t really been thought through in the overall design I felt and the close mechanism is rather violent (but possibly needed to close a large heavy door).

The cabins were nice though putting these problems to the side even if they did vibrate something chronic.

Customer service.

I was a bit miffed that the free wifi was only for 3 hours and the ‘reception all over the boat’ meant one bar if you’re lucky.  We also got an incredibly poor service when purchasing food as what we wanted from the menu wasn’t actually available and my husband ended up with a microwave meal and I ended up with a chicken burger that makes McDonalds look like a 5 star restaurant.  The guy who ‘cooked’ our meal was more interested in the football on the plasma tv installed in the food court than customer service. We had no offer of help to carry the tray and no ‘quiet area’ as in my previous blog.  Too much money spent on umpteen plasma screen tvs and bars than on customer care I think.

I remember when… “it’s not far to fall”

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There was this one time when I was at work an hour and a bit away form home,  and assured my meeting room had 1 accessible loo. On arrival I saw a sign ‘out of order’ I enquired and was dismayed at having to stay there for many hours with no loo to use!

A maintenance guy came back and said oh don’t worry, it’s just that the seat wobbles as it’s broke (giving me a demo of a very wobbly, broken, seat that was totally unsafe).

Considering I have no balance at the best of times I resigned myself to the fact that I would have to cross my legs. He then said something like ‘it’s not that far to fall anyway… I’m sure it will be ok’.   Eh hmmm. Guess I’ll be wetting myself then…

 

Utopia Fair – what is World of Accessible Toilets doing?

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Earlier this year I was delighted to be invited to contribute to the Travelling Toilet Tales film – where a number of us shared our story about planning journeys around toilet requirements. At home I have the right facilities, space, design etc … but outside the home and on holiday it’s a different story.

I chose to contribute via narrating a poem about how difficult it is to go on a day out and find a toilet that is suitable – even with the basics!

Pop to the festival to find out more, listen to our contributions and chat with those attending. I can’t go in person but I will be around on Twitter and our Facebook page to chat about the weird and wonderful (and hugely varied) toilet designs and how this can impact disabled people.

The Utopia Fair will be hosting 35 representatives from contemporary utopian movements from all over the UK on stalls in the Somerset House courtyard. The Travelling Toilet Tales stall will offer the public an exciting first glimpse of a draft of our animated Toilet Tales film. Featuring stories from a range of toilet users, including truckers, disabled parents, and non-binary people, the film is an exploration into the ways in which everyday journeys are planned around the un/availability of a suitable toilet. Visitors will also get the chance to listen to the individual toilet stories in full, browse our postcards and artwork, and talk to the special guests joining us on the stall.

Next door, the Servicing Utopia project will be joined by artists who will invite visitors to create utopian toilet models. This weekend will also present the first opportunity to view the interactive digital Toilet Toolkit and short animated film produced by the Servicing Utopia team. The toolkit is aimed at architects and other design professionals to promote the accessible design of toilet spaces and will allow users to virtually ‘walk around’ toilet spaces and interact with items within the space.

 

Our newest research projects, Travelling Toilet Tales and Servicing Utopia, will both appear at the Utopia Fair in Somerset House in London this weekend (24th-26th June). The Utopia Fair will be hosting 35 representatives from contemporary utopian movements from all over the UK on stalls in the Somerset House courtyard. The Travelling Toilet Tales stall […]

via Utopia Fair – Join us this weekend (24 – 26 June)! — Around the Toilet

Gender neutrality and accessible toilets

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Accessible_toiletSo for the last 6 months or so there has been much discussion on gender neutrality and which toilet you use.

Followed by ‘if anyone can use a toilet, what sign do we put on the door’.  Oh my goodness – do you put a man and a woman, both, half and half, something totally different …. or maybe just a picture of a toilet would be pretty sensible?

Whilst the world goes crazy trying to figure this out …. accessible toilets have been caught in the cross fire.

Our ‘unisex’ toilets don’t have any gender specific symbol

gender_wheelchair_toilet.jpgYou see, we never had any gender identity to begin with. Someone thought ‘we’ might be best represented by a genderless person, usually with no neck, sitting rigid (probably because they sat on a broom handle or something)  in an odd shaped wheelchair.

If we had gender then wouldn’t we have had this toilet sign?

 

 

We don’t think – is this representing a man, woman etc to decide whether to go in or not …. we just see the symbol, on a single occupancy room, and know that beyond the door is a toilet which is hopefully surrounded by adaptations and space to use it.

This symbol isn’t even toilet specific – it might not be a toilet behind the door it could be an ‘accessible’ anything because this is just a universal symbol for access in relation to disabled people.

Not only genderless but not representative

One of the issues is that this symbol doesn’t even represent three quarters of the people who can use an accessible toilet – anyone with a medical condition who needs the adaptions or quick toilet access.

It doesn’t represent people who have an impairment but don’t use a wheelchair. It’s also a major barrier for people who think the symbol represents disability and they don’t identify with being disabled (e.g. older people, people with IBS and mental health problems often do not define themselves as disabled and feel the toilet is for ‘others’). How do you get over that?

Do we need a totally new, universal accessible toilet symbol – and how on earth could we pick something meaningful to everyone. This has been the problem and reason why most countries stick to keeping the symbol of a wheelchair user.

Why this symbol does not make it the designated gender neutral toilet.

Because of the rise in people speaking out about needing a toilet that is gender neutral, some businesses are saying ‘ we already have a toilet just for you [points to the accessible toilet].

This is not a toilet for ‘anybody’ to use … if people don’t have an impairment then they shouldn’t be taking up a toilet with adaptations.

People looking for a gender neutral toilet don’t want to be taking up facilities that are for disabled people. It’s awkward and discriminatory, all round. People just need a toilet. One with adaptations and one without. It’s simple.

Disabled people might need quick access to the toilet because of their medical condition (and may need to go more frequently and stay longer). Every ‘other’ person (be it a parent needing baby changing or a transgender person etc) is taking away the accessibility feature of ‘availability’ every time they use it.

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I sincerely hope that we don’t start seeing this sort of thing become the norm. A sign to represent a gender neutral toilet – attached to what used to be an accessible toilet only for disabled people. I am hearing that this is starting to happen though and it’s worrying.

This will cause so much distress to disabled people who need quick toilet access but may now have to wait because the toilet has been opened up to anybody – all because of a sign.

 

 

Launching our new campaign

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Today we launch our new campaign #BiggerIsBetter [Bigger Is Better].

We hear over and over again how much people struggle with the size of wheelchair accessible toilets.

Unfortunately, the size suggested by building regulation guidance is far too small for the types of wheelchairs and scooters that people use today.

We need to raise awareness and explain why meeting  building regulations does not mean they are meeting their legal duties to provide usable toilets under the Equality Act [Disability Discrimination]. Very few businesses are aware of this.

Wheelchair users can often not get into these toilet spaces, turn around or transfer safely. They become unusable. An unusable toilet might as well not be built.

Every toilet that gets built to this size could mean decades of  being unable to use that toilet. If nothing happens now – the future will remain bleak.

If the standards are not going to change, then the only way forward is to reach out to as many businesses and new developments as possible and encourage them to see that bigger is better.

 

We need to encourage larger spaces and where possible Space to Change or Changing Places. Without larger spaces, wheelchair and scooter users will continue to struggle to live as equal citizens in the UK.

Please join the campaign and help spread the word. Share our posters, pictures and your experiences.

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Standards for people with sight loss

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For buildings completed since October 2015, the following features will satisfy the requirements for sanitation provision.

These features are essential so that people who are blind or have a visual impairment, can access the toilet.

General considerations

  • Contrasting colour of door handles, door and door frames – always good to know where the door is and how to open it! 
  • An auditory alarm to warn of a fire (i.e not just a visual indicator)
  • An emergency chord alarm that is distinguishable from the fire alarm
  • An emergency chord that is identifiable and visible
  • Surface finishes of fittings and support/grab bars must have a particular level of contrast with the wall and floor (and the wall and floor should also contrast).

I have been into many toilets where there is a white floor, white walls, white toilet, white sink, white emergency chord  ….. a field of white glare to many people with visual impairments. I also find it a bit disorientating and I have good vision.

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Lack of contrast colours in a hospital accessible toilet and written only information

The statement on what is meant by ‘visual contrast’ has been deleted in the latest Building Regulation Doc M. Further work is being done to evidence what level of contrast or finish might improve visibility.

Light reflected of surfaces can be measured – called LRV (Light Reflection Value) when a surface is illuminated. Nearer to 0 would represent black and nearer 100 represent white on this scale.

The difference in visible light reflected provides differences in these values.  A LRV difference of 30 was generally a good figure to use and to avoid high gloss finishes. This would enable more people to tell the difference between surfaces when their vision is impaired – which may cause a reduction in the hue (nature of the colour) or chroma (intensity of the colour). 

Equality Act considerations

For any toilet room / toilet block, the following are also ways to meet the Equality Act 2010 to complement the above.

  • Clearly defined toilet roll dispenser (or toilet roll)
  • Assistance to navigate to the toilet room
  • A Braille description is good practice for any visual signs (toilet door symbol, warning signs, how to operate equipment etc). 
  • Appropriate space inside or outside the toilet room for assistance animals.

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People with sight loss need to be able to find a toilet and use it to have equal access to sanitation. This might mean altering signage or providing someone who can audio describe where the features are in the toilet. 

I’ve been to toilets where the  toilet roll is randomly placed on the floor, a shelf or ‘pick a wall, any wall’. This would probably be unlawful as it creates barriers for people.

The last thing you want to be doing is feeling around a public toilet or having to get so close to see something that you can almost touch it with your nose. Pretty disgusting.

Poor lighting, flickering lighting – it all makes a difference.

It is also useful to consider that some people with sight loss may also have other impairments such as learning difficulties, hearing loss, brain injury, or a person be on medication which impairs vision – so they should be equally able to use an accessible toilet. 

Attention to lighting can help people with autism as well – so insist on new accessible toilets meeting the full British Standard as a minimum to feel confident you have tried to be as inclusive as possible.