Welcome to our new website!

We have a brand new website and new ways you can support the project.

For business looking to improve or begin a new accessible toilet build or students doing design or social community courses – our new membership support plans are ideal.

Business members get access to over 100 pages of information in our unique publications at a 40% discount and students get them for free. Business yearly support membership is only £30.

All members also get free 1:1 advice and consultancy.

If you have found our information blogs helpful you can also support the project by donations. Just a few pounds to help keep information free for disabled people and their families would be a significant help!

Thank you for your ongoing support.

Government consults on mandatory Changing Places

The government is undergoing a public consultation (part 1) providing the finer details of including Changing Places toilets in the Building Regulations (Document M, Sanitation).

Visit: Changing Places (England) Consultation

You can have your say on issues such as:

  • Types of buildings
  • Trigger values eg cinemas would be based on x number of seats, others triggered by footfall or space.
  • Size and equipment provided
  • Costs to businesses
  • Equality impact assessment of provision.

Full details are contained in the pdf document provided on the consultation page. You can participate by email or online.

Using a toilet as a first aid room

First aid room toiletYou were having a nice day out until you took a tumble and you’re now bleeding profusely from your knees and elbows …. off to the first aid room you go.

Would you accept treatment if the first aid room was a toilet / restroom and the ‘seating/rest’ area was a bed near the toilet that had previously been used to change a filled nappy?

Would you be thinking ‘surely this isn’t the right environment to treat an open wound?’

When a first aid room becomes a toilet room

I think most of us would be quite shocked to know that first aid rooms at some public venues / tourist locations are being offered up as ‘toilets’ to disabled people? Did you know that disabled people are having soiled pads changed on first aid beds? Some disabled people may be using camping toilets or commodes in the same space.

Should this be allowed? Let’s look at the issues.

[Article by Louise Watch. Louise has formerly worked for 7 years managing mobile and static first aid posts at public event and venues. Louise also uses a wheelchair and hoist].

Why is it happening?

There are large numbers of visitors to public events who can not use standard ‘accessible toilets’. On a number of occasions first aiders and ambulance staff have had to help people who have not been able to get up from the toilet or who have fallen – usually because the space has been too small to use safely.

Some people need carer support, space, a hoist to transfer from wheelchair to toilet or a bed to lay on to remove clothing, use a catheter, have a continence pad changed. However, venues across the world have been declining to put in suitable toilet facilities known as Changing Places, and instead are telling visitors with these requirements, to use the first aid room.

Safety and practical concerns

  • The obvious first problem is that this assumes that older and disabled people are incontinent – and use adult nappies. So they can just lay down on the bed and change, right?

Wrong. Most are not, they just need a toilet in a room with enough safe manoeuvring space or a hoist available … and first aid rooms do not have a toilet in them. They also do not have hoists or the space to use them.

I have been in hundreds of first aid rooms whilst looking after sick and injured visitors and never once seen a toilet inside. Usually there is a cupboard with medical supplies and a bed, chair, sink and maybe a privacy curtain. So how the offer of a first aid room is going to help continent disabled and older people is a mystery.

  • Are they thinking about supplying a commode or camping toilet?

Maybe – but it’s not something a first aid room would have as standard and commodes vary a lot and come with their own hazards eg stability, wheels that need breaks on, variable heights and seat types. People can easily fall if it’s not suited to their balance or abilities. Proper accessible toilets have specific features for a reason eg

  1. gently curved toilet seats or specific shapes that support hip stability and protect pressure sores.
  2. a toilet that is anchored to the ground and won’t tip over
  3. a seat specially designed to withstand ‘rough’ transfers,
  4. support rails at a particular height either side
  5. if a person stays in their hoist sling then this is a total body support in itself.

Commodes can be dangerous if they don’t match the needs of the person and can cause serious accidents.

Commodes also need to be cleaned/emptied between different people and human waste and menstrual blood has to be disposed of correctly. First aid rooms are not equipped for this which means someone will have to walk the filled pan to a nearby toilet to flush away. Will that be staff or visitors?

It is also questionable whether hygiene standards for spills and splashes could be dealt with in a first aid room environment. Infection control becomes a big issue that would probably need a full risk assessment.

  • What about people who just need a bed?

People who need a bed to have a soiled pad changed could possibly use a first aid room but there would have to be a full risk assessment to look at the following areas:

  1. If a hoist is needed, is there sufficient space for a portable or gantry hoist? In my experience, there is rarely enough room.
  2. Infection control is needed if urine, faeces and other fluids are likely to have touched the bed. It might be possible to risk assess alongside the usually assessments for cleaning up body fluids such as blood, vomit and saliva wipe down methods for infection control. This should be in place in a first aid room as standard. Carers/assistants are likely to already be familiar with this when using Changing Places toilets and home facilities.
  3. There is, however, a greater risk if a proper cleaning procedure has not been followed by staff or carers – eg if the next casualty to use the bed has open wounds. Equally, an immune compromised disabled person may be at risk if a casualty has used the bench and has an infection and has vomited over the bed as is often the case. I have seen some pretty poor hygiene and infection control practices in first aid locations.
  4. Access to a sink for water to clean and wipe the person should be available from the first aid room sink – again infection control protocol could be used and general wipe down procedures that toilet cleaning staff might also utilise.
  5. There would need to be access to human waste and sanitary bins not provided by first aid rooms.

Duel use at the same time

The other challenge to turning your first aid room into a toilet is that it can take 40-60 minutes to hoist a disabled adult onto the treatment table, change and clean them, then get them back comfortably in their wheelchair. Then add on another 15 minutes for cleaning and disinfecting. What if there is a casualty who needs treatment during this time. Both can’t use it at the same time unless you have a first aid room laid out like a hospital with cubicles and more than one treatment area/bed.

Should first aid rooms be offered as toilets?

In light of the above – no, unless the first aid room is very large and more like an A&E department with staff training to match regarding infection control and clinical waste disposal.

Even if I was offered a commode, hoist and private cubicle I would find it insulting and undignified to have to visit a first aid room, where patients might be, to use the ‘toilet’. This would not be equality in terms of bathroom provision. It is certainly not an appropriate solution for the hygiene needs of older and disabled visitors/guests.

FAQ: The RADAR accessible toilet key

What is a RADAR Key? [updated March 2018]

The RADAR key Company have manufactured the vast majority of keys many know as RADAR keys over the past 25 years. They are needed to open a large number (10,000 plus) of accessible toilets in the UK which are part of the National Key Scheme (NKS).

History of the key

RADAR is an organisation that no longer exists – it became part of a new company Disability Rights UK (DRUK). They started the National Key Scheme in the UK.

The RADAR Key Company no longer supply keys to DRUK but continue to make the keys for the National Key Scheme and improve on them.

What toilets do they open?

The keys open toilets fitted with the RADAR National Key Scheme (NKS) locks. Toilets fitted with these are for the use of disabled people and are found all over the country (e.g. pubs, restaurants, leisure venues, tourist places, shopping centres, stations, airports etc).

What types are there?

There are two types – one with a small head and one with a very large head for people with grip or dexterity difficulties. Both used to be silver with the word RADAR Key embossed on them fit into an NKS door lock or NKS padlock . The door locks often look like this:RADAR_lock

Keys now look like this:

A new solid brass key.

They are long handled to bypass vandal protection blocks built into doors.

Who can have one?

Any individual with an impairment / medical condition who needs access to these larger toilets or hygiene facilities or needs facilities to assist mobility or navigation (such as hand rails, lower basin, contrasting colours, different toilet height or seat arrangement, changing table, hoist for example).

One downside is that you do not need proof of need to purchase one so parents and non disabled people can abuse the scheme.

Where do I buy a genuine key from?

You can buy brass (improved) genuine (tested and guaranteed to work) keys from the makers of the original key :

Radarkey.org

price £2.50

Other sellers of ‘genuine’ keys include this one from Disability Rights UK (4.50). [personally I prefer the improved brass one as opposed to a love heart blue key that is rather stigmatising. Some may prefer it if they want it to stand out and know they have it in their bag].

I have seen them for sale elsewhere – do they work?

Fake RADAR Key Fake RADAR Key

There are hundreds of places claiming to sell ‘genuine’ keys including many prominent charities and mobility shops. Most have a red handle and are mass produced in China. I strongly advise against these keys.

One of the reasons for making a new brass key is to avoid people being ripped of by fakes that may be so rough cut and out of shape that they don’t easily open toilets, if at all. Keys may not be tested by a master locksmith or damage locks.

Tom Gordan from their sales team told me:

“Disabled people need genuine Radar keys because they are dependent on them to open what is often the sole toilet which they can use. 
Genuine keys genuinely work all the locks because they have extra machining processes and are more reliably cut and also more accurately cut.
Each one is tested on a radar toilet lock (not the padlocks which are a more basic mechanism) by a master locksmith to guarantee that a disabled person does not suffer.
Identification of genuine keys is easy – if it says “radar” and ‘NKS’ on it, it is a genuine radar key. If it doesn’t then it is an inferior copy.
Including postage, the majority of the dodgy keys are sold for more than genuine ones direct from us at the RADAR Key Company, so the confusion leads to those copies creating both awkward situations and extra cost.”

How do I find a toilet?

A free App is available for Changing Places toilets and coming soon will be one for other accessible toilets. This is available for Android and Apple phones and on the web.

A booklet for regional locations is available on the DRUK website costing £3.50. However, it will cost you £70 to purchase all regions!! I’d download a free App to find their locations made by the RADAR Key Company!

The majority of toilets use the scheme so it’s probably best to just follow signs to toilets/accessible toilets as anyone would do.

Why are accessible toilets often locked with these in the UK?

Many places choose to install NKS locks on their toilets to keep them clean and reduce the chance of them being abused by people who don’t need to use them, vandalised or used for drugs, sexual activity or a wide range of other things!

Support this project to continue to provide information through membership or donating some sparkle (that’s like coffee but more creative!)