FAQ: The RADAR accessible toilet key

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What is a RADAR Key? [updated March 2018]

The RADAR key Company have manufactured the vast majority of keys many know as RADAR keys over the past 25 years. They are needed to open a large number (10,000 plus) of accessible toilets in the UK which are part of the National Key Scheme (NKS).

History of the key

RADAR is an organisation that no longer exists – it became part of a new company Disability Rights UK (DRUK). They started the National Key Scheme in the UK.

The RADAR Key Company no longer supply keys to DRUK but continue to make the keys for the National Key Scheme and improve on them.

What toilets do they open?

The keys open toilets fitted with the RADAR National Key Scheme (NKS) locks. Toilets fitted with these are for the use of disabled people and are found all over the country (e.g. pubs, restaurants, leisure venues, tourist places, shopping centres, stations, airports etc).

What types are there?

There are two types – one with a small head and one with a very large head for people with grip or dexterity difficulties. Both used to be silver with the word RADAR Key embossed on them fit into an NKS door lock or NKS padlock . The door locks often look like this:RADAR_lock

Keys now look like this:

A new solid brass key.

They are long handled to bypass vandal protection blocks built into doors.

Who can have one?

Any individual with an impairment / medical condition who needs access to these larger toilets or hygiene facilities or needs facilities to assist mobility or navigation (such as hand rails, lower basin, contrasting colours, different toilet height or seat arrangement, changing table, hoist for example).

One downside is that you do not need proof of need to purchase one so parents and non disabled people can abuse the scheme.

Where do I buy a genuine key from?

You can buy brass (improved) genuine (tested and guaranteed to work) keys from the makers of the original key :

Radarkey.org

price £2.50

Other sellers of ‘genuine’ keys include this one from Disability Rights UK (4.50). [personally I prefer the improved brass one as opposed to a love heart blue key that is rather stigmatising. Some may prefer it if they want it to stand out and know they have it in their bag].

I have seen them for sale elsewhere – do they work?

Fake RADAR Key Fake RADAR Key

There are hundreds of places claiming to sell ‘genuine’ keys including many prominent charities and mobility shops. Most have a red handle and are mass produced in China. I strongly advise against these keys.

One of the reasons for making a new brass key is to avoid people being ripped of by fakes that may be so rough cut and out of shape that they don’t easily open toilets, if at all. Keys may not be tested by a master locksmith or damage locks.

Tom Gordan from their sales team told me:

“Disabled people need genuine Radar keys because they are dependent on them to open what is often the sole toilet which they can use. 
Genuine keys genuinely work all the locks because they have extra machining processes and are more reliably cut and also more accurately cut.
Each one is tested on a radar toilet lock (not the padlocks which are a more basic mechanism) by a master locksmith to guarantee that a disabled person does not suffer.
Identification of genuine keys is easy – if it says “radar” and ‘NKS’ on it, it is a genuine radar key. If it doesn’t then it is an inferior copy.
Including postage, the majority of the dodgy keys are sold for more than genuine ones direct from us at the RADAR Key Company, so the confusion leads to those copies creating both awkward situations and extra cost.”

How do I find a toilet?

A free App is available for Changing Places toilets and coming soon will be one for other accessible toilets. This is available for Android and Apple phones and on the web.

A booklet for regional locations is available on the DRUK website costing £3.50. However, it will cost you £70 to purchase all regions!! I’d download a free App to find their locations made by the RADAR Key Company!

The majority of toilets use the scheme so it’s probably best to just follow signs to toilets/accessible toilets as anyone would do.

Why are accessible toilets often locked with these in the UK?

Many places choose to install NKS locks on their toilets to keep them clean and reduce the chance of them being abused by people who don’t need to use them, vandalised or used for drugs, sexual activity or a wide range of other things!

Slings, hoists and money pits

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Another disability money making scheme?

Recently I had the annual inspection of my ceiling hoist. My hoist covers the area from my bed to my toilet and wheelchair. The inspection includes a visual check that my sling is safe to use. In fact, the law requires a sling inspection twice each year. It costs around £100 for a hoist and sling safety assessment.

My sling is as rugged as hell – in fact I can’t imagine how it would get torn or ripped without slashing it with a knife several times!! Basically it would probably last me 20 years.

However … and here is the rip-off, the sling can fail and be declared instantly unusable if the serial number can not be read.

Now, slings are made to be washed – and just like clothes, the little cloth tag can begin to show faded writing. So my £500-600 sling could be assigned to the bin after a years worth of washes! A perfectly maintained and safe sling, thrown away because of a faded number.

Will companies make a serial number that is permanent that can withstand several washes? Apparently, the word on the street is that key companies were asked to do just that but refused because it brings them greater profits by forcing everyone to repurchase new ones. Imagine schools and hospitals having to pay out thousands each year to get new slings that are otherwise safe to use.

Equally, a company can say they no longer ‘support’ a particular hoist model and the user also has to throw that out within six months as they are automatically deemed unsafe.

The overall result is that individuals, schools and hospitals, public swimming pools, social services and companies who have Changing Places hoist equipment are throwing away large amounts of equipment that may still be usable for a number of years.

Products that are purchased are now being chosen because they are cheap to replace and not because they are safe, dignified, comfy and the ‘right one’ for the user.

Calling all manufacturers…

I invite manufacturers of patient slings and hoists to comment on their policies and manufacturing processes where efforts are being made to ensure serial / product numbers can last the lifetime of any sling and that ‘discontinued’ products can still be supported for the life of existing equipment . These would also come under the companies policy to cut down on environmental waste.

Helpful or not – petitions

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There are over 80 petitions on Change.org calling for signatures to back calls to governments and businesses for accessible toilets. Most are by individuals calling particularly for Changing Places toilets.

Are petitions helpful?

Psychologically petitions and demonstrations by disabled people and carers are useful – providing the 'I feel I am doing something rather than nothing'. People who sign genuinely want to say 'this needs to change'. However, the reality is that petitions rarely achieve results.

No amount of signatures is going to change the law or monitor adherence to building regulations. In the UK, the government have heard, via parliamentary debates, how we need accessible toilets. They end with empty promises.

As we speak the draft of revised access standards has been drawn up – setting British standards for what could be used in buildings which last over 50 years. They don't include any change to toilet provision. They are based on the dimensions of wheelchairs, for example, from 20 years ago. Petitions won't impact these.

Dilution of support

Petitions aim for x number of signatures …. people might sign one or two but 80? If campaigns were centralised into one petition there could be thousands of supporters rather than a few hundred.

Change in strategy

The movement to ensure toilets for all is disjointed. Often it's based on promoting the needs of children rather than the needs of disabled people of all ages. People with obesity, dementia and autism are often totally ignored. Many campaigns are based on the need for hoists and changing benches – yet we still have toilets being built that are supposed to follow strict building regulations, but don't for 'independent' disabled people. There are failings at every level. Equality laws do nothing to persuade businesses that disabled people need accessible toilets.

What can we do to actually make a difference?

  • Share a petition rather than recreate one for yourself
  • Look out for opportunities to comment on building regulation guidance, local access consultations, health consultations etc.
  • At every opportunity provide feedback about toilet access. Use social media, review websites, council feedback forms, patient feedback cards at hospitals etc.
  • Use formal complaints procedures.
  • Write to your MP
  • Provide witness statements for parliamentary debates

Sounds like a lot of effort? That's why it's easier to sign a petition and have our social guilt relieved – we've done all we can, right? Now everything will be ok?

No it won't – but deep down you know that.

Launching our new campaign

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Campaign_header.jpg

Today we launch our new campaign #BiggerIsBetter [Bigger Is Better].

We hear over and over again how much people struggle with the size of wheelchair accessible toilets.

Unfortunately, the size suggested by building regulation guidance is far too small for the types of wheelchairs and scooters that people use today.

We need to raise awareness and explain why meeting  building regulations does not mean they are meeting their legal duties to provide usable toilets under the Equality Act [Disability Discrimination]. Very few businesses are aware of this.

Wheelchair users can often not get into these toilet spaces, turn around or transfer safely. They become unusable. An unusable toilet might as well not be built.

Every toilet that gets built to this size could mean decades of  being unable to use that toilet. If nothing happens now – the future will remain bleak.

If the standards are not going to change, then the only way forward is to reach out to as many businesses and new developments as possible and encourage them to see that bigger is better.

 

We need to encourage larger spaces and where possible Space to Change or Changing Places. Without larger spaces, wheelchair and scooter users will continue to struggle to live as equal citizens in the UK.

Please join the campaign and help spread the word. Share our posters, pictures and your experiences.

Bigger_Is_Better_Poster1.jpg

What’s at Naidex in the loo department?

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So, it’s that time of year again where I laugh at have a serious look at what’s new at Naidex – the crazy convention showcase that is all things health/lifestyle/disability. We take a look at the exhibitors lists and play ‘spot the new toilet gadget’.

If you spot something we have missed – let us know!

First up – the Innovation Trail

This is the annual shortlist of products less than a year old or new ideas which are being launched at Naidex. Sometimes you see some crazy things you think ‘there is no way anyone will buy that’ through to ‘oh that’s a good idea’.

So what’s new in the toilet / hygiene department?

Well, forget taking a ride on the rotating shower tray (I kid ye not) and head over to Stand H37 for PDS Hygiene. They will be showing off their bidet shower chair (BSC-100) and what looks like a new model of their hand held powered travel bidet.

I’m not sure how the bidet shower chair would work over the Biobidet models BB1000 and later as they rely on skin contact with a sensor on the seat to power up.

If barrier creams are more your thing – then take a look at 3M’s stand over in section D38. They can show you their Cavilon Barrier Cream that can help skin that has become sore (or could become sore) from incontinence.

Geberit_AquaClean_8000plus_care.jpgThe new Gerberit AquaClean 8000plus Care (wow that is some name) might be worth a look (Left).

It’s a shower toilet that is compatible with many paediatric shower chairs being activated by button or remote control. I assume it is also compatible for for adult over the toilet chairs too. They are over on Stand G29B

Still on the theme of all singing and dancing toilets – Aquarius Hygiene (Stand D36) have their own version of a wash/dry toilet seat similar to the BioBidet range they are calling the Intelligent Bidet. It is powered by a tethered remote with other options available.

Looking at the picture, for my personal bum comfort, I prefer a wider and more contoured seat – and seat shape and comfort really matters as you sit through the wash and dry actions (and you have to be sitting in the right place!!). So, shop around and compare specifications according to what suits.

Other products and companies to check out.

All the usual exhibitors are back for 2016. You might also want to check out companies selling hoists and toilet slings – although some of the big names like Liko do not appear to have a stand listed if you believe the search function.

  • Product list searches do not appear to bring up all products shown within individual companies e.g. search for sling and it says there are only 5 products.
  • Toilet brings up 26 products – somewhat disappointing considering how critical/essential it is.
  • Could not find any ostomy products listed. Coloplast – are you there?

Aquarius Hygiene

As well as their new Intelligent Bidet, their other products include the Porta Bidet and Handy Bidet travel kit.

ArjoHuntleigh: 

Products include the Carendo over the toilet shower chair/hygiene chair and shower tables/changing benches.

Designability

Toilet Handles

Toilet_Handles.jpg

Ergolet – Hera Hygiene chair and changing trolley/bench amongst others.

Hera_hygiene_chair.jpg

Euan’s Guide – if you haven’t got their red cord cards, where have you been this last year! Go and take a look.

Made 2 Aid

Wheelable – an over the toilet shower chair.

 

Wheelable.jpg

NRS Healthcare: Bringing out the new SeaHorse models of toileting and shower chairs for children and young adults. (Stand J7)

Pressalit Care

“Our product range includes height adjustable washbasins, toilets, changing benches and shower seats”

Pressalit happen to have my favourite most comfortable toilet seats “accommodating different shaped toilets and people”.

 

1st Call Mobility

Baros_Commode.jpg

They have the Baros – a heavy duty heigh adjustable shower commode/ over the toilet commode for people with obesity

Finally the things that aren’t disability specific …

The BlueBadge Company are selling toiletry bags.

 

Guide 3 – Going beyond the minimum requirements

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Our third guide can be downloaded from: Links and resources page.

Beyond_standards

Going beyond the minimum requirements

Our 26 page guide looks at why going beyond the standards is often required to avoid discrimination, promote social inclusion and welcome all disabled employees, visitors, customers and volunteers.

We hope you will find the information useful if you:

  • Are passionate about improving the accessibility and usefulness of toilets for disabled people through campaigns and personal discussions.
  • Wish to raise discussions with a business concerning a difficulty you have had accessing or using provided toilets.
  • Are designing or submitting planning applications involving a new accessible toilet or altering existing ones.
  • Are responsible for the maintenance of sanitation facilities.
  • Are planning an event or function and assessing the sanitary needs of potential visitors.
  • Are a business, who provides toilets for disabled staff, visitors, customers and volunteers – and wishes to provide the highest possible standard of ‘away from home’ toilets.
  • Are committed to the welcoming provision of a truly accessible toilet to demonstrate your commitment to social inclusion and equality.

 

Contents

Current types of accessible toilets
Legal requirements
Be aware of ‘Compliant Doc M toilet packs’
Difficulties people have using accessible toilets
How AD M introduces barriers to using the toilet 
Toilet height
Support / grab / hold rails
Barriers relating to support rails
Privacy
Space considerations 
Space is needed to do a range of activities in the toilet.
Space requirements in the Building Regulations. 
People who are unable to stand or balance on a toilet.
Barriers to using the toilet, in the minimum provided space.
What research tells us about the size of wheelchairs.
Inadequate space to transfer from the side of the toilet.
Space needs of Carers / Assistants.
Turning circle space inadequacy
Baby Changing and Odour sensitivity.
Emergency cords tied up or not present.
Ensuring the toilet is available.
Assistance with hygiene.
Thank you to: 

 

Guide 2 – What makes a toilet accessible?

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Our second guide can be downloaded from: links and resources page.

What_makesWhat makes a toilet accessible? An introduction to the needs of disabled people and assistants/carers.

A 30 page guide providing a brief introduction into the facilities that should be provided in a public accessible toilet to ensure dignity, safety and equality of toilet and hygiene provision.

We hope you will find the information useful if you:

  • Are passionate about improving the accessibility and usefulness of toilets for disabled people.
  • Wish to raise discussions with a business concerning a difficulty you have had accessing or using provided toilets.
  • Are building a new toilet or upgrading your existing facilities.
  • Are responsible for the maintenance or cleaning of sanitation facilities.
  • Are designing or submitting planning applications involving a new accessible toilet or altering existing ones.

 

Contents

About this Guide
Contents
Toilet types and signage
Three types of toilet
Legal requirements
Disability Equality
Building Regulations and British Standards
Health and inclusion
What should I find in a new accessible toilet?
Unisex, individual accessible toilets.
Changing Places toilets using BS 8300 (2009)
Accessibility features
Door entry and locking
Lights and accessories
Toilet height and seat type
Washing / drying toilets
Other accessibility features
Examples of a stylish toilet that is not accessible
Sinks and their function
Use of toilet paper
Facilities for people with bladder and bowel disorders
Availability – an important part of accessibility
Provision for people to manage their bladder/bowel
People who have an ostomy
Using the toilet whilst standing, or sitting in a wheelchair.
People who use a hoist
Needs of Carers / Assistants
People with other needs
Privacy
Stigma
Thank you to…

 

*AD M = Approved Document M.  This is available from the official planning portal web-site [http://www.planningportal.gov.uk] for the most up to date information and documents.

Launching 3 exciting publications

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Today we launch the first of 3 new publications that you can download from our links/resources page

Legal_requirements

Guide to Accessible Toilet Standards and Equality Act Requirements.

This 17 page guide is to help raise awareness about the standards, guidelines and equality laws surrounding the provision of toilets for use by disabled people and their carers/assistants.

We hope you will find the information useful if you:

  • Are passionate about improving the accessibility and usefulness of toilets for disabled people through campaigns and personal discussions.
  • Wish to raise discussions with a business concerning a difficulty you have had accessing or using provided toilets.
  • Provide toilets for disabled staff, visitors, customers and volunteers – and wish to provide the highest possible standard of ‘away from home’ toilets.
  • Are committed to the welcoming provision of a truly accessible toilet to demonstrate your commitment to social inclusion and equality.

 

Content

British Standards and AD M 
When do AD M requirements apply?
What if a new toilet does not follow these standards?
Types of accessible toilets 
Equality of toilet provision – what the law says. 
Be aware of ‘compliant’ suppliers
The duty to make reasonable adjustment and AD M
Do I have to follow the solutions in AD M?
Employment law
Human rights
UN Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities
Making adjustments 
What reasonable adjustments might include.
Auxiliary aids or services
Attracting customers and improving community inclusion
Facilities on request.
Thank you to:

*AD M = Approved Document M.  This is available from the official planning portal web-site [http://www.planningportal.gov.uk] for the most up to date information and documents.

Novamed’s unique bed hygiene / toilet system

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Novamed_Europe_-_Better_SolutionsNovamed Europe are our guest bloggers this week with their innovative hygiene / toilet solution – Solaticare .

For full information and a brochure visit: http://novamedeurope.com/products

or you can chat with them, about their product directly or over on our Toilet Talk   Face Book group.

Solaticare

Novamed2

Solaticare is an exciting new solution for those who are unable to access toileting facilities independently, once in bed.

It promotes dignity by allowing the user an independent solution to the need to eliminate, although a carer may also assist in the process.

There are two options – an automatic version located in the workings of an electric bed, and a community version, which uses a specially adapted mattress placed on a standard bed, with the help of a carer.

How you use it

To use the hospital bed model, the user needs to be lying supine, without pants, sheets may remain in situ. Using the remote control, the process is initiated with the press of one button. The mattress infill moves down and away, the Solaticare suction head then rises through the mattress to its working position, in very close contact with the body. When the user urinates and/or defecates into the suction head, the sensors within the suction head will remove the waste into a hermetically sealed unit next to the bed, once this has finished, rinsing with warm water follows, and the process finishes with warm air to dry the skin. The in-built catalytic deodorizer neutralizes any unpleasant odours. Then the suction head returns to its original location, and the mattress infill returns to give a comfortable feel to the bed.

The community model requires the help of a carer to positon the suction head with its hoses in a specially designed mattress cut-out, prior to use, and then it needs removing at the end of the process. There are infill pieces to restore the mattress integrity.

Novamed1

Hospital bed model

The extraction unit is located by the bed stores the clean water and waste, emptying/refilling is needed usually just once a day. The process can also be controlled from the control panel on the extraction unit. This also includes controls to personalise settings, as times and temperature can be altered to suit personal preference. There is also a voice prompt option which tells which process is in function. It also comes with an optional shower hose which helps patient shower whilst in bed.

What do you think?

Choosing an over toilet chair / commode

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For the last few months I’ve been searching for a solution to sitting on the toilet whilst on holiday. In my particular case, my hips splay outwards and I have to sit on a very specifically shaped toilet seat. If I don’t, I have so much pain that I can’t go or balance. There are many different shapes of toilet seat – hole aperture differs in shape and size, the bevel of the seat can be highly ridged, a gentle curve or totally flat. I have low muscle tone, hip contractures, poor balance and my hips dislocate. My husband also has to manually lift me to transfer.  All in all, I struggle when sitting on most toilets.

So, the solution was to take a portable over the toilet chair that meets specific criteria:

  • low enough to transfer
  • adjustable to cope with different heights of toilet
  • a contoured seat (wide round aperture with no cut away – i.e. not horseshoe shaped)
  • arms that moved completely out the way to transfer and were height adjustable
  • removable foot rests / foot plates with no brackets sticking out to trip over.
  • portable to take on holiday
  • stable (I lean a lot to one side because of scoliosis)

So… how hard could this be out of the thousands of models available to purchase.

It turns out, it was impossible. I bought the closest thing I could find and my husband modified it (I found a suitable seat in Homebase and my husband did some engineering to attach it to the frame).

This blog shows some of the huge variations in shower/over toilet chairs that are available and some of their pros and cons. I hope you find it useful – please ask if you have any questions.

To view a range of models and descriptions – see my pinterest board for a range of examples of toilet chairs, seats and hygiene products.

Types of over the toilet chairs for adults.

Basic_Commode_ChairThis is a basic design. A flat seat, round aperture and rigid frame.

Footplates are often fixed or just have flip up feet parts – so tripping or catching them when transferring can be a problem. Some have fixed arms that are not removable and are a fixed height – so they might not go over the toilet at all. This one does not fold away – few come apart for transporting on holiday or folding when not in use.

Hospitals tend to have basic ones like this. I find them unbearably painful! They range from around £50-100

 

Assistant_Propelled_Freeway_T40

This is an example of the Freeway range of chairs. You can see that this chair has a padded seat. Many of these types have a choice of seat type.

A Horseshoe seat has a gap in the front or rear of the seat (and sometimes the side).

An aperture seat is a ‘donut’ with varying length and width of the hole (some are keyhole shaped, others are round or more oblong). The type of hole can make a huge difference to comfort – as can the depth of padding.

Most seats are flat – so if you need one that is sloping forward that might be hard to find. Some specialist seats offer backward tilt or ’tilt in space’ function – more about that later.

These types vary in how adjustable they are – simple things like how angled the footplates are can also make a difference to stability if moving in the chair. You can see the angle on this chair has the footplates a lot more out in front – which makes the chair longer to manoeuvre into bathrooms and over the toilet.

When you look underneath the chair, you can see it is totally free to go over the toilet – no bars or snagging parts. Note how the back is straight up, vertically aligned to the back castors – meaning you can get right back over the pan and won’t be peeing on the floor!

chilterninvadexThe chair on the left is from Chiltern Invadex. You can see the horseshoe type seat. Note how small the armrests are.

This is a common problem if you really need to lean on them (or rest arms on them). They are often hard plastic, uncomfortable and so small your arm falls over the side, which can mean you could fall sideways to some extent.

Consider how much you need to grab onto the arms and whether you need one that is padded or has a good width.

Arms also reach forward and are longer in some models more than others. This might be important in being able to stand, adjust your sitting position, grip etc. These are £4-600 and can have headrests, belts and other accessories.

 

 

Freeway_shower_chair

This is an example of a chair that has a high support back/head rest and also tilts backwards. Some have manual tilt and others are powered. You can expect to pay £1000-3000 pounds for these.

One thing with these is that you may need to use them with a commode pan because when tilted, they don’t usually fit over the toilet.

 

 

 

EtacThis is an Etac chair. The design is uncluttered and the footrest slides back under the seat. You can see the depth of padding and contoured seat.

A feature of this one is the gap at the back of the horseshoe seat – ideal if you have coccyx pain or pressure sores, or need someone to reach under to wipe.

Different chairs come with different backs. Some are flat canvas, others are hard plastic. This is a bit different in that it’s curved. However, if you have a spinal deformity this might be a problem and cause you to become sore or not Etac chair retails for around £560

 

Self_Propelled_Freeway_T50

 

Chairs can be pushed by an assistant (four small wheels or castors, each with brakes), self propelled (large wheels in the front or rear), or static. This is the Freeway T50 which retails for around £460

 

 

 

 

A note on height adjustment

If you want a chair to role over the toilet, for travelling, it is worth noting the following:

  • toilet pans in the UK vary in height. The lowest (floor to seat) are usually 39-46 cm and the high ones are 48-52cm

High_toilet

Toilet chairs vary in how much clearance they need to go over the toilet.

This can add another 4-6cm to the height, plus the height of any padded seat on your toilet chair. You could end up with a height that is impossible to transfer to or reach, unless you use a hoist.

  • toilet chairs may come in a range of fixed heights – so you could go on holiday and find the height you have chosen does not go over the pan.
  • the chair I chose, came with adjustable heights to alter without tools.
  • If the chair raises up – do the footplates also raise up (many do not so you may not reach them if you have short legs).
  • If you go with a set height the gap between the seat and pan might cause splash out.
  • Check if the model will go over any bidet/hygiene toilet – not all do.
  • The seat height might be adjustable – but are the armrests fixed?
  • The wider the arms are, if you have them at a certain height they could hit the fixed grab rails on toilet walls.

 

What did I choose?

I went for this one – the Invacare Ocean. I went for the wider spaced arms XL version. You can see how we modified it as I couldn’t use the seat it came with.

Invacare_Ocean

No modifications – the Invacare Ocean

I don’t need the heigh adjustable foot plates so we took them off. This was the bathroom in our room at the Future Inn in Plymouth. It’s a robust chair which does come apart for storage/travelling and we bought the carry bag accessory. However, we are not convinced it will fit in the bag as the back is wider than the XL version in the brochure. We took it already assembled (it arrives flat packed). The arms are very narrow and hard but it has a few levels of easy seat height adjustment and a small amount of arm height adjustment – this was about the middle setting. The toilet pan is fixed flush with the wall and the chair goes over it well.  It fits well in-between the wall grab rail and can still be used with the commode pan and slide rack it came with. It feels robust and managed the journey pushing it from the carpark to our room. Doubles up as a luggage cart (but slightly unsteady over some bumpy ground). I didn’t use it over the toilet this time as the height of the pan was a little high for transferring but I did use it for showering. It’s not light, so you would need the wheely bag (or a case) to transport it in if you can’t take it pre-assembled. We fit it behind me in our sit in the front wheelchair accessible car without a problem.

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