Caught short – the myth 

Standard

An interesting comment came my way stating that ‘normal’ people caught short should be allowed to use the accessible loo the same as non disabled people who need the loo urgently.

Let’s put this to bed right here. 

We have covered before how part of the criteria of being accessible is ‘availability’ of accessible toilets. I.e not taken up by non disabled people who could go elsewhere.

So what if the non disabled person is caught short? Well the reason is different. One person has, as an adult, improperly and in error been unable to time when they needed to empty their bladder or bowel. With some mental competence, being caught short could have been avoided. They then wouldn’t have had to dive into an accessible toilet?

 Disabled people might have a medical need known as urgency where they may only have a minutes warning before their bladder releases whether they are in the loo or not. Clearly these people with a medical need (or arguably a medical need from an upset stomach or similar) require available facilities of an accessible toilet to preserve health and dignity. 

Simply being caught short because someone has not made time for the toilet in their day is no excuse to use up an accessible toilet. 

What do you think?

5 thoughts on “Caught short – the myth 

  1. Today in ASDA had to wait for little old biddy to come out of one and only disabled loo, complete with trolley of shopping!

    A loo requiring a radar key is less likely to be abused?

  2. I whole heartedly agree with everything you have said.

    I say this as someone that is blind and has a guide dog but also has a physical disability and a chronic health condition where I may get minutes warning to get to the loo now before my bowel empties.

    Ticking so many accessible toilet boxes provides its own challenges.

    I would go further and say baby change facilities should not be in the accessible toilet.

  3. Michelle Ann

    In an ideal world this would not happen, but particularly for women, there is often a shortage of toilets, and I don’t think you can blame someone in dire need for using a vacant accessible loo if there is a long queue at the ladies. It shows the importance of having adequate toilet facilities for everybody.

  4. John Thornton

    Thought provoking blog, thanks. This appears to happen (most obviously) in workplace settings, where one knows the non-disabled person and, even before challenging them, they excuse their use of the accessible loo by saying they were caught short. Before you know it this odd exception becomes a habit and then they develop a sense of ownership and entitlement.

    Of course, challenging people, asking them if they are entitled to use the loo, can be fraught with problems. I’ve done so on two occasions and both times the women in question have curtly responded that they have stoma bags, “Is that enough?” one quipped!
    Ouch!

  5. John Thornton

    This appears to happen (most obviously) in workplace settings, where one knows the non-disabled person and, even before challenging them, they excuse their use of the accessible loo by saying they were caught short. Before you know it this odd exception becomes a habit and then they develop a sense of ownership and entitlement.

    Of course, challenging people, asking them if they are entitled to use the loo, can be fraught with problems. I’ve done so on two occasions and both times the women in question have curtly responded that they have stoma bags, “Is that enough?” one quipped!
    Ouch!

Share a comment

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

w

Connecting to %s