All about support / grab rails

Standard

Taken from our guide (see links page) we look at the importance of support rails in accessible toilets. AD M is approved document M of the U.K. Building Regulations.

It is possible to have many layouts to allow for the provided dimensions and fixture configurations in AD M.
 

The general layout of a unisex accessible toilet is to have horizontal grab rails to both the left and right side of the toilet [AD M: S 5.8].

Heights, lengths and distance from the toilet / sink / mirror etc must be precise as described in AD M.
Vertical rails must also be provided in specific places.

How many rails do people need?

74% of disabled/older people use handrails. They can be used to pull/push up with or simply to lean on for stability.

41% of powered wheelchair users prefer the right side, 30% the left and the rest had no preference in a 2005 study.

Some people need a rail both sides and on the back wall.  The rails needs to be the right height, length, distance from the toilet/sink, thickness and colour.

An accessible toilet must  have at least 5 support rails with additional ones if the toilet is located some distance from the wall. 


Barriers introduced

As can be seen above, support rails can infringe on the transfer space and cause problems for some wheelchair users.

Solutions

  1. Assess your toilet – do they have the full complement of support rails and are they in the right place and the right length / height? 
  2. Mix it up – the standard suggests that if you provide more than one unisex toilet, a choice of layouts for left and right hand transfer should be provided. 
  3. The smaller the space, the more grab rails will get in the way for powered wheelchair users and carers – re-consider your design space. 
  4. Provide Changing Places toilets in addition to existing accessible toilets. The larger spaces to the left and right of a central toilet offer more transfer option angles for people who use powered wheelchairs, large walkers/ frames, or need carers to assist them.

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