Guest Blog. It meant I could have a drink.

Standard

  

This month we are focusing on the needs of people who need help or equipment to stand up from the toilet.

Find out more about our topic and people who might experience difficulties in this post.

Our first guest blogger shares their enlightening story …

(Guest blogger has chosen to remain anonymous, South UK)

I live with a muscle wasting disease. It is progressive and over the years I have had to adjust to my declining physical state. I have come to terms with the loss of dignity and independence and I am accustomed to family, friends, carers and strangers assisting with the most intimate of tasks. The times I got stuck on toilets and had to be helped up by strangers of either sex was no fault of mine. This disease progresses as it will it seems; one day I could get off a regular water closet with a great struggle, the next I could not get off even with the knowledge that I was about to invite a stranger to rescue me from the most embarrassing of positions.

You would think that a hospital would have the facilities and knowledge to ensure that all people who use it could use the toilet. It is the most basic of needs! I have had surgeries when I would not be allowed to leave until I had used the toilet. Now, even with the help of carers, there is hardly any toilet in my local hospital that is accessible to me. I have had to resort to even more creative solutions when enduring any of my frequent hospital visits. There is no point wearing a diaper as there appears to be no toilet that has a hoist or a changing table. I try not to drink before most hospital visits but sometimes the appointment is for a scan and the instructions are to drink 2 litres of water before the procedure. 

For now, I can just about manage to pass urine into a bottle. I cannot sit on the toilets as even if I wanted to attempt a side transfer my carer could not fit into most toilets with me and my bulky wheelchair. Even when we do fit in a toilet the toilet is too low for a transfer and there isn’t enough space to park parallel to the toilet. So, whenever I need to go to hospital I use Imodium and Desmomelt when I want to avoid the toilet. Yes, it is drug abuse, but I consider it a pre-emptive strike so I do not have the indignity of needing the toilet and not being able to use it. 

More space to transfer helps. If there could be height adjustable toilets that would be great. 

I remember my excitement when I visited the Essex Coalition for Disabled People and saw a raised toilet seat in the toilet. It meant I could have a drink.

[Thank you to ‘anonymous’ for sharing this story for our project)

One thought on “Guest Blog. It meant I could have a drink.

Share a comment

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

w

Connecting to %s